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Shirley Hoy is new chair of U of T's Governing Council

Former city manager and CEO of Toronto Lands Corp.

head-shot-style photo of Shirley Hoy

Shirley Hoy has been appointed to serve as the new chair of the University of Toronto Governing Council. 

Hoy is a Lieutenant-Governor in Council and was elected vice-chair 2013. Until 2014 she was chief executive officer of Toronto Lands Corporation. From 2001- 2008, Hoy was city manager of Toronto. 

"Being a member of the Governing Council for almost eight years has allowed me to see a lot more of the university,” says Hoy. “I’m looking forward to continuing to work with the council members to address the important issues affecting our university community.”

The chair ensures Council provide effective oversight, and plays an essential role in ensuring the meetings are run in a democratic manner. Hoy succeeds alumna Judy G. Goldring, whose term as chair comes to an end as of June 30, 2016. 

“I admire Judy – she’s set a high bar in terms of excellence in governance,” says Hoy. “Judy has built a very strong foundation, one that I will work with the entire council to uphold.” 

When passing the torch, Goldring advised Hoy that she’ll have to allocate a lot more time to U of T, to which Hoy says “I’m prepared to do that.”

Hoy says she will continue to build on the priorities Goldring established, just as Goldring used the work of previous chairs to establish hers. These priorities include fostering outreach and meaningful relationships with the governors, focusing on the importance of the preeminent position of U of T in its research, teaching excellence and attracting best students to the university, and strengthening relationships between the Governing Council and the president’s team in order to support the university’s short and long-term goals.

“If we have engaged and effective governors, it will ensure we have the system we need to provide proper accountability,” says Hoy. “A trusting, respectful and open environment will facilitate thoughtful discussions of difficult and complex issues.” 

Some of the matters the Governing Council oversees include the management of the university’s academic, business and student affairs. The 50 members, including faculty, staff, students, alumni and government appointees, ensure the decisions made by the Council are in the best long-term interests of the university. The president and chancellor of the university serve by virtue of their positions. Meeting approximately eight to nine times a year, Governing Council meetings are held in open session and can be attended by the public. 

“With regard to major issues, there is a lot of consultation done with the broader community before final decision-making at the Governing Council,” says Hoy. “It’s this collaborative process that allows us to provide the best experience for the entire university community.”

For more information on U of T’s Governing Council, visit: www.governingcouncil.utoronto.ca