graduate programme

NEAR EASTERN ARCHAEOLOGY AND HISTORY(EGYPTIAN, SYRO-PALESTINIAN, ISLAMIC)

 

NMC 1400Y INTRODUCTION TO THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE ANCIENT NEAR EAST (=NMC 260Y)

This course is designed to provide a general introduction for students with no prior background in the archaeology of the Ancient Near East. The course will be organized chronologically around broad precessual themes (e.g. the origins of agriculture, emergence of urbanism, the rise of state-ordered societies, etc.), and will trace their historical development within the various geographical sub-regions of the ANE. Emphasis will be placed on cultural history, while exploring the complex processes of social organization and change that gave shape to the remarkable cultural accomplishments of the ANE world.
Course requirements will consist of: (1) reading assignments (see course schedule); (2) four non-cumulative exams covering material presented in class and in the primary reading assignments (4 x 20% = 80%); and (3) two short essays (2 x 10% = 20%). Essays are due at the beginning of class and lateness will be penalized by a 10% reduction in mark per day.


NMC 1406Y PROBLEMS IN THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF BRONZE AGE SYRIA-PALESTINE



NMC 1407Y PROBLEMS IN THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF IRON AGE SYRIA-PALESTINE

The Levant (modern day Israel, the West Bank, Jordan, Lebanon and Syria) is one of the most intensively explored archaeological regions in the world. While substantial regionalism exists, the entire area nevertheless constitutes a distinct cultural region with (broadly speaking) more similarities than differences. In addition to reviewing research methods historically employed by archaeologists working in the region, attention will be devoted to exploring new and innovative approaches and methodologies, while focusing on current issues and debates in the field. Emphasis will be on in-depth analysis of archaeological sources (in combination with documentary sources where appropriate), from a broadly anthropological perspective, with the aim of enhancing understanding of the social and economic history of the region. Evaluation will be based on student presentations and a major research paper.
T. Harrison


NMC 1408Y SEMINAR IN THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF SYRIA-PALESTINE

T.P. Harrison


NMC 1409H THE ARCHAEOLOGY AND MATERIAL CULTURE OF ANCIENT EGYPT I

This seminar will examine the archaeology of ancient Egypt from the Predynastic period through the Middle Kingdom, focusing on the archaeological evidence and the contributions that the analysis of that material have made to our understanding of cultural development.  Particular emphasis is placed on the theoretical and methodological issues associated with the interpretation of material culture from Egypt.  Students will also have access to artifactual material in the collection of the Royal Ontario Museum. 
Evaluation is based upon a major research paper, a seminar presentation, one term test, and class participation.
M.A. Wegner


NMC 1410H THE ARCHAEOLOGY AND MATERIAL CULTURE OF ANCIENT EGYPT II

This seminar will examine the archaeology of ancient Egypt from the Second Intermediate Period through the Late Period, focusing on the archaeological evidence and the contributions that the analysis of that material have made to our understanding of cultural development.  Particular emphasis is placed on the theoretical and methodological issues associated with the interpretation of material culture from Egypt.  Students will also have access to artifactual material in the collection of the Royal Ontario Museum. 
Evaluation is based upon a major research paper, a seminar presentation, one term test, and class participation.
M.A. Wegner


NMC 1411H NEAR EASTERN CERAMICS I (=NMC 465H)

This course will examine methods of classification and analysis (form, fabric and style) involved in the study of archaeological ceramics, and the use of ceramics to infer patterns of production, distribution and social organization linking research questions with appropriate analytical techniques.
T. Harrison



NMC 1412H NEAR EASTERN CERAMICS II (=NMC 466H)

This course will focus directly on the study of Near Eastern ceramic sequences, with a primary emphasis on assemblages from the region of Syria-Palestine, utilizing the collections of the University of Toronto and the Royal Ontario Museum.
T. Harrison


NMC 1414H EGYPTIAN ARTIFACTS

This course will focus on the development of major types of artifactual material from ancient Egypt. Primary emphasis will be placed on the study of ceramic sequences, but other aspects of material culture will also be examined in terms of their development and chronological significance. Analytical methods will also be discussed. Students will have the opportunity to work directly with the Egyptian collection of the Royal Ontario Museum.
M.A. Wegner


NMC 1416H EGYPTIAN ICONOGRAPHY

This course deals with the recognition and interpretation of ancient Egyptian symbols and the representations of divine and royal figures as preserved in the epigraphic record. Evaluation is based on seminar presentations, class participation, and a major research paper.
K. Goebs


NMC 1418Y ARCHAEOLOGY OF NUBIA

The subject of this course is the archaeology of the Nubian cultures from the Middle Stone Age until the end of the Christian Period (ca AD 1300). The study area is the Middle Nile Valley between Aswan and Khartoum, but the relationships with Egypt and other Northeast African cultures are also discussed. Through the use of site and survey reports and the study of artifacts from the Royal Ontario Museum collections the student is expected to acquire in-depth knowledge of the cultures of ancient Nubia. Occasional class presentations and one major research paper are required.
K. Grzymski


NMC 1419Y ART, ARCHAEOLOGY AND CULTURE OF EGYPT IN THE AGE OF THE PYRAMIDS

The cultural and social history of the Egyptian Old Kingdom (ca 2650-2150 BC) is the main subject of this course. The emphasis will be placed on the study of the archaeological remains, art and architecture of the period known as the pyramid age. Important sites will be examined in detail and artifacts from the Royal Ontario Museum will be studied. Evaluation is based on class presentations and a major research paper.
K. Grzymski


NMC 1420Y SELECTED TOPICS IN NEAR EASTERN ARCHAEOLOGY


NMC 1421Y SEMINAR IN EGYPTIAN ARCHAEOLOGY

IIn this course students will have the opportunity to investigate specific problems in the archaeology of ancient Egypt, which were introduced in NMC1410Y. The course will reflect the interests of students, and will seek to analyze some of the relevant archaeological issues within their cultural context.
In 2003-04, the course will focus on the archaeology of Egypt from the Third Intermediate Period through the Greco-Roman Period. We will investigate the material culture of these often-neglected periods, with specific attention to the increasingly diverse population of Egypt and the effect and nature of interaction with various foreign influences on Egyptian culture as represented in the archaeological record.
M.-A. Wegner


NMC 1422Y POLAZRIZED-LIGHT MICROSCOPY IN ARCHAEOLOGY (=NMC 462Y)

The use of polarized-light microscopy in the examination of ceramics, stone, other materials, and microstratigraphy. Lectures in elementary optical mineralogy and case-studies are followed by lab sessions in which typical thin-sections of rocks, pottery, soils and other materials are studied.
R. Mason

 

NMc 1425H    MESOPOTAMIAN MATERIAL CULTURE I: ART AND ARTIFACTS

This course focuses on a comprehensive introduction and discussion of Mesopotamian artwork from the Neolithic to the Iron Age periods (ca. 6000 - 300 B.C.). Following an introduction of major artifact classes (including sculpture, relief, and glyptics [seals and sealings]), students will learn to describe and catalogue works of Mesopotamian art, allowing them to critically use and evaluate primary and secondary publications. Systematic descriptions and labels for key characteristics such object materials, size, iconography, genre, style, and theme will be established to show how meaningful artifact typologies can be constructed. The potential as well as limitations of art-historical approaches for archaeological work, especially for chronology and the interpretation of archeological contexts, will be discussed and examined on selected cases. Several classes will be taught at the Royal Ontario Museum to demonstrate the handling and physical analysis of artifacts.
C. Reichel


NMC 1500Y-F ARCHAEOLOGY FROM ALEXANDER TO MUHAMMAD (=NMC 366Y)

The Macedonian conquest of Asia had a profound effect upon the Middle East in terms of administration, city life, and material culture. Yet indigenous ways were not entirely obliterated. A hybrid culture of Greek, Arab, and Persian expressions emerged. These in turn, had a marked effect upon the development of material culture after the beginning of Islam. These principles can be observed in the archaeological record of, amongst other places, Palmyra (Syria), Hatra (Iraq), Seleucia/Ctesiphon (Iraq), Nippur (Iraq), Jund-i Shapur (Iran) and Qal’eh-i Yazdigird (Iran).
E. Keall


 

NMC 2541Y CONTEXTUALIZING MEDIEVAL MIDDLE EASTERN AND ISLAMIC POTTERY (=NMC 469Y)

This course will use ceramics to study the material culture of the medieval Middle East and the central Islamic lands. As such, they will be running narrative, to which other materials will be referred, or in turn used to refer to other materials. The same motifs found on ceramics may be found in the contemporaneous buildings, textiles or woodwork; the same forms are found in metalwork and glass; illustrations on ceramics will survive better than manuscript paintings, and there are more illustrations of, for instance, medieval swords to be found on pottery than there are actual swords. The course will rely heavily on the collections of the ROM, and provide a thorough grounding on the technical production and typological variability of the various types of materials attested within their archaeological and cultural context. This course offers an excellent opportunity to study this important period of ceramic production, the period of occupation which covers most early sites in the Middle East. It provides essential understanding of the ceramic corpus for anyone seriously considering archaeological research in the Middle East and Mediterranean.
R. Mason