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All events are free and open to the public, but registration is required.


EVENTS IN 2013-2014

External event: Hutsuls Focus for St. Vladimir Institute Events

September 17 – 29, 2013 Photo Exhibit and Sale at St. Vladimir Institute:
The Hutsuls – photo chronicles of the vanishing culture by Youry Bilak, France

September 21, Saturday, 7:00 pm.
Who are the Hutsuls?: From Dovbush to “Dyki Tantsi”, presentation by Dr. Maria Sonevytsky, PhD in Ethnomusicology (Columbia University, NY), and  current P. Jacyk Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies (U of T)
Hutsul-style refreshments by Future Bakery.

September 28, Saturday, 7:00 pm. Film screening The Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors (English subtitles) with comments by Professor Paul Robert Magocsi, PhD, Historian, Chair of Ukrainian Studies, U of T

Poster: download here
Location: St. Vladimir Institute, 620 Spadina Avenue, Toronto, ON
Contact: 416-923 3318

Tuesday, September 24, 2-4 PM
Viktor Yelensky
(Ukrainian Catholic University and the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine) Religion and Politics: The Significance of  the Ukrainian Commemoration of the 1025th Anniversary of the Christianization of Rus’

Political and church leaders placed high hopes in this unusually numbered (1025 years) jubilee of the Christianization of Rus'.  For Viktor Yanukovych it was to be the beginning of his presidential campaign; for Vladimir Putin, a serious step in the drawing of Ukraine into the Eurasian union; for Patriarch Kirill of the Russian Orthodox Church, a demonstration of the unity of “Holy Rus',” while for both the Kiev Patriarchate and for the Ukrainian Greek-Catholic Church, it was to allow the consolidation of religious-national forces and the strengthening of the “Ukrainian world.”  The jubilee revealed that religion in the post-Soviet space in general and in Ukraine in particular is becoming an ever more important resource for political mobilization and nation building.

Viktor Yelensky is a Professor  at the Ukrainian Catholic University in Lviv and professor at Drahomanov National Pedagogical University in Kyiv.  A sociologist of religion, he holds his MA in History from the Taras Shevchenko Kyiv National University, and his Candidate Degree and PhD Degree in the Study of Religion from the Institute of Philosophy of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. He is also the President of Ukrainian Association for Religious Liberty.  Prof. Yelensky has published five books and numerous articles that focus on religion in Ukraine, post-communist religious transformation, religious freedom issues, and global religious trends. His most recent book is The Great Comeback: Religion in Global Politics and International Relations in the late 20th–early 21st Centuries. (Lviv: Ukrainian Catholic University Press, 2013).

Register here
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies.

Friday, September 27
Contextualizing the Holodomor: A Conference on the 80th Anniversary, Day One

The conference will examine what the scholarship on the Ukrainian Famine of 1932-1933 has added to our understanding of broad fields such as Soviet history, Stalinism, Communism, Ukrainian history, and genocide studies.  Presenters include Andrea Graziosi, Norman Naimark, Olga Andriewsky, Stanislav Kulchytsky and Roman Serbyn. Discussants include David Marples, Mark von Hagen, Douglas Irvin, Liudmyla Hrynevych, Serhii Plokhii and Frank Sysyn.

Register here Download Poster Here
Campbell Conference Facility, South Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Holodomor Research and Education Consortium (HREC), the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Saturday, September 28
Contextualizing the Holodomor: A Conference on the 80th Anniversary
, Day Two

The conference will examine what the scholarship on the Ukrainian Famine of 1932-1933 has added to our understanding of broad fields such as Soviet history, Stalinism, Communism, Ukrainian history, and genocide studies.  Presenters include Andrea Graziosi, Norman Naimark, Olga Andriewsky, Stanislav Kulchytsky and Roman Serbyn. Discussants include David Marples, Mark von Hagen, Douglas Irvin, Liudmyla Hrynevych, Serhii Plokhii and Frank Sysyn.

Register here Download Poster Here
St. Vladimir Institute, 620 Spadina Avenue
Sponsored by the Holodomor Research and Education Consortium (HREC), the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Friday, October 4, 12 noon-2 PM
Mark Freiman
(Lerners LLP, Toronto) The Giant Crosses in the Ancient Jewish Cemetery in Sambir: Ukrainians, Jews, and their Canadian Diasporas

Mark J. Freiman practices law at the firm of Lerners LLP in Toronto.  He is currently lead Commission Counsel for the Military Police Complaints Commission for an extensive Public Interest Hearing.
He has previously served as Lead Commission Counsel for the Commission of Inquiry
Mr. Freiman is co-author of The Litigator’s Guide to Expert Witnesses, and frequently writes, teaches and speaks on topics related to national security, human rights law and media.  He has been the recipient of numerous academic awards and has also taught extensively at the university level.

In addition to undergraduate and law degrees from the University of Toronto, Mr. Freiman also holds a PhD. in Modern Thought and Literature from Stanford University.

Register here
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for Jewish Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

External event: Sunday, October 6
Holocaust: New Scholars-New Research

Canada holds the chair of the International Holocaust Research Alliance (formerly the International Task Force on Holocaust Remembrance) for 2013. As part of the annual meeting, which will take place in Toronto, there will be an academic conference, "Holocaust: New Scholars-New Research on the Holocaust," which will take place on October 6-7, 2013. Beginning with an event open to the public on Sunday evening, October 6th, the conference will screen a new Israeli film, “Numbered,” dealing with Auschwitz survivors, to be followed by a panel discussion featuring Dr. Vivian Rakoff, a pioneer in the field of Holocaust-related psychiatry; Na’ama Shik, an historian from Yad Vashem; and Carson Phillips from Toronto’s Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre.

Innis Town Hall, Innis College (2 Sussex Avenue)
Sponsored by the Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair in Holocaust Studies and the Government of Canada, with the support of the Centre for Jewish Studies, the Faculty of Arts and Science, the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Department of History, Konstanty Reynert Chair of Polish History, and the Sarah & Chaim Neuberger  Holocaust Education Centre, UJA Federation of Greater Toronto.

External event: Monday, October 7
Holocaust: New Scholars-New Research

On Monday, twenty-four speakers from eleven countries will showcase and consider new Holocaust-related research in the field in six discussion panels.  The conference papers will explore new sources, methodologies and approaches to key themes such as reportage, militaries, subject nationalities, cooperation and collaboration, and postwar issues. The themes will include gender; economic and religious and cultural aspects of the Holocaust; local studies that impact wider interpretations; and contributions of media and literature to an understanding of the Holocaust; and many other innovative and interdisciplinary topics.

Several presentations at the conference will be related to the history of Ukraine and Ukrainians. See the conference programme HERE and download the poster HERE.

William Doo Auditorium, New College Building III (45 Willcocks Street)
Sponsored by the Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair in Holocaust Studies and the Government of Canada, with the support of the Centre for Jewish Studies, the Faculty of Arts and Science, the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Department of History, Konstanty Reynert Chair of Polish History, and the Sarah & Chaim Neuberger  Holocaust Education Centre, UJA Federation of Greater Toronto.

Monday, October 7, 4-6 PM
Roundtable "Ukraine within Europe?:  Opportunities and Obstacles"

In March 2012, the text of an EU-Ukraine Association Agreement was initialed. It was to be the successor to the Partnership and Co-operation Arrangement that has guided EU-Ukraine relations since 1998. An essential feature of the expanded relationship includes the establishment of a Deep and Comprehensive Free Trade Area, which has been under negotiation since 2008. The ratification of the Association Agreement, however, has been stalled by European concern about the “stark deterioration” of political rights and the rule of law in Ukraine under the Yanukovych administration. At the same time, Russia has been pressuring Ukraine to move away from the European option in favour of a Customs Union within the rubric of the Eurasian Economic Community.

The geopolitical and cultural implications of these negotiations are profound. They will be examined by a panel of experts, including Yevhen Bystrytsky (International Renaissance Foundation, Open Society Foundation), Valeriy Chaly (former deputy foreign minister of Ukraine and now deputy general director of  the Razumkov Centre in Kyiv), and Oleksiy Haran (political science, Kyiv Mohyla Academy National University). Lucan Way (University of Toronto) and Oleh Havrylyshyn (University of Toronto) will be discussants.

Register here
Room 208, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Thursday, October 10, 4-6 PM
Alexandr Voronovici
(Central European University) "The Moldovan ASSR: Creating a Ukrainian Autonomous Region within the Ukrainian SSR"

In the interwar period a narrow strip of land on the South-Western border of the Soviet Union became the meeting point of conflicting nation- and culture- building ambitions and geopolitical visions of the party activists in Moscow, Kharkiv, Odessa, as well communists from Romania. In the talk Alexandr Voronovici tracec the process of the establishment of the Moldovan ASSR on this territory (which roughly corresponds to the territory of the nowadays unrecognized Transnistrian republic) in 1924. The talk will demonstrate how a certain understanding of the future of the republic and the identity of the local population emerged as predominant in the party politics. The talk will devote special attention to the impact of the Ukrainian party activists. It will follow to demonstrate the role of the “Ukrainian factor” in the nationality policies in the first several years after the establishment of the Moldovan ASSR.

Alexandr Voronovici is a PhD Candidate in History at the Central European University, Budapest, and an AFP Returning Scholar and Lecturer at the Department of World History of “Ion Creanga” State Pedagogical University, Chisinau, Moldova. Currently he is writing his PhD thesis entitled "Soviet Borderland Policies in the Ukrainian SSR and the Moldovan ASSR, 1922-1934."

The talk will be chaired by Lynne Viola.

Register here
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Tuesday, October 29, 12:00-2:00 PM
A conversation with Yuri Vynnychuk, author of Tango of Death

Meeting Ukrainian Writers Series (Mr Vynnychuk will be interviewed by Profs. Taras Koznarsky and Maxim Tarnawsky)

Yuri Vynnychuk is a Ukrainian writer, journalist, and editor, based in Lviv. Mr. Vynnychuk will talk about his writing, the cultural situation in Lviv, and his vision of politics in Ukraine.
Register here
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Danylo Husar Struk Programme in Ukrainian Literature of CIUS.

Friday, November 1, 2-6 PM
"A Language that
'Did not, Does not and Cannot Exist': 150 Years Since the Valuev Decree." A Symposium.

Featuring:

“Neither Dead Nor Alive”: Ukrainian Language on the Brink of Romanticism by Taras Koznarsky (the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Toronto):

This presentation explores statements about, attitudes toward, and classifications and conceptualizations of the Ukrainian language in the cultural discourse of the Russian empire in the first two decades of the nineteenth century, a transitional period before the advent of romanticism.  In particular, it focuses on the conceptualizations of Ukrainian language in ethnographic descriptions of Ukraine (Markovych,  Levshin), in the first grammar of Ukrainian by Oleksii Pavlovsky (1818), and in literary applications of the Ukrainian vernacular in poetry and prose in the early nineteenth century.

The Valuev Circular and the language that “has not, does not and cannot exist,” Michael Moser (the University of Vienna, the Pázmány Péter Catholic University in Budapest/Piliscsaba, and the Ukrainian Free University in Munich):

This presentation explores the following questions: Has the language that was, according to the Valuev Circular, “the same as the Russian language, with the exception of some corruptions from Poland,” actually ever been “the same as the Russian language”? When does a language exist or not exist? With regard to the concept of modern standard languages, to what level had the Ukrainian language developed by 1863? And what did the Ukrainian activists themselves think about it?

Fiction and forgery in official information about Ukrainian national movement in the beginning of 1860s by Johannes Remy (University of Helsinki, Finland):

Russian imperial authorities used intentional disinformation and even forged a revolutionary proclamation in order to discredit Ukrainian national activists in the 1860s in order to convince doubters in their own ranks concerning the Ukrainian question and their repressive policy. The myth of the Ukrainian movement as a Polish creation was created and disseminated for this purpose.

Ivan Nechui-Levytskyi and the Prohibitions on Publishing Ukrainian Literature, by Maxim Tarnawsky (the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Toronto):

The impact of the Valuev Circular and Ems Ukaz on Ukrainian culture is a complex question that warrants a finely tuned and nuanced examination. The paper attempts to measure the impact of the Valuev Circular (and the later Ems Ukaz) by tracing their influence on the career and the writing of Ivan Nechui Levytskyi. Most of Nechui's adult life was shaped in one way or another by these repressive measures. Of course, they hampered his ability to publish his works, but they also contributed to his developing relations with a number of other figures, particularly publishers in Lviv and the Kyiv Hromada. These links were instrumental in creating a robust and effective mechanism for the development of a unified and attractive Ukrainian cultural movement.

Register here
Room 107, Alumni Hall (121 St. Joseph Street)
Sponsored by the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Friday, November 29, 12-2 PM
Anna Bazhenova
(Institute of East-Central Europe, Poland; Petro Jacyk Visting Scholar) "Russification through Education: Warsaw Imperial University and its Mission in Polish Society"

As the Warsaw University is preparing to celebrate its 200 anniversary in several years, many scholars are researching the past of this academic institution. In her talk Hanna Bazhenova will to discuss one of the most unknown and controversial pages of the university’s history: the Russian period of its existence (1869–1915). The talk will demonstrate why Warsaw Imperial University was established, what was its main mission in Polish society and why it was forced to leave the city in 1915, after 46 years of existence. Special attention will be devoted to the analysis of the faculty members of the History and Philology Department (many of whom were the graduates of Saint Vladimir University in Kyiv). Hanna Bazhenova chose to focus on historians because their work was closely connected to the language and ideology of power.

Dr. Anna Bazhenova (Petro Jacyk Visiting Scholar) is a doctoral candidate in John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin and a research fellow of the Institute of East-Central Europe (Poland). The areas of her scientific interests include the history of the European universities of the 19th and 20th centuries, the history of Ukrainian humanities and arts, international contacts of historians and modern European historiography.

Chair: Dr. Michael Kasprzak

Register here
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Friday, December 6, 2-4 PM
Whither Ukraine: Will Yanukovych Survive the EuroMaidan?

This week, hundreds of thousands of Ukrainians flooded the streets of Kiev in response to President Yanukovych’s decision to postpone an Association Agreement with the European Union. Why did efforts to reach an agreement between the EU and Ukraine fail? What does this failure tell us about Russia’s influence in the region? Is a second orange revolution in Ukraine in the offing? Two experts on Ukrainian politics, Taras Kuzio (CPRS, CIUS, University of Alberta) and Lucan Way (CERES, University of Toronto), will discuss Ukraine’s future on Friday between 2 and 4 in the Campbell room at the Munk School of Global Affairs. Katerina Sosnina, a second-year PhD student in Ukrainian history at the National University “Kiev-Mohyla Academy” who is on academic exchange at CERES this semester, will join the panel to share her reflections on the events in Ukraine and youth involvement in the protests. Professor Peter Solomon (CERES, University of Toronto) will moderate.

Register here
Campbell Conference Facility, South Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Munk School of Global Affairs, Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Wednesday, January 8, 12-2 PM
Adrian Ivakhiv
(The University of Vermont), "Becoming Tuteishyi:  Peregrinations in the Zona of Ukraine, with Walter, Gloria, Andrei, Bruno, and Other Explorers"

Drawing on the author's research and travels, this talk will consider Ukraine's ambiguous positioning within global cultural discourse by recourse to theories of borderlands (via Walter Mignolo and Gloria Anzaldua), hybridity and amodernity (via Bruno Latour and Donna Haraway), postcommunism and postcolonialism, and to images of anomalous zones and errant wanderings, with particular attention to Andrei Tarkovsky's Stalker.

Adrian Ivakhiv is Professor of Environmental Thought and Culture at the University of Vermont's Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources. His research focuses at the intersections of ecology, culture, identity, religion, media, and the creative arts. He is the author of Ecologies of the Moving Image: Cinema, Affect, Nature (2013), Claiming Sacred Ground: Pilgrims and Politics at Glastonbury and Sedona (2001), and executive editor of The Encyclopedia of Religion and Nature (2005). He blogs at Immanence: EcoCulture, GeoPhilosophy, MediaPolitics.

Register here
Room 208, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Friday, January 17, 10-12 AM
Marina Zaloznaya
(University of Iowa), "Petty Corruption and Bureaucratic Fragmentation in Post-Transitional Ukraine"

Marina Zaloznaya's research interests include organizational and economic crime, development and democratization, and comparative-historical research methods. She is currently examining the way that different socio-political regimes in the post-Soviet bloc shape the informal economies of local universities. In another project she is developing a conceptual framework for the study of corruption from a sociological prospective. Her teaching interests include global and comparative criminology, sociology of informality, and comparative-historical methods.

Register here
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Friday, January 24, 4-6 PM
The Fate of EuroMaidan in Ukraine
: A Roundtable

Since late November, thousands of anti government protesters have occupied the center of Kyiv in Ukraine. Four experts on Ukrainian politics will discuss the progress, implications, and likely fate of the protests: Marta Dyczok (University of Western Ontario and CERES), Taras Kuzio (CPRS, CIUS, University of Alberta), and Lucan Way (University of Toronto, CERES). Volodymyr Kravchenko (University of Alberta) will moderate.

Register here
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and Canadian Institute for Ukrainian Studies.

Thursday, January 30, 2-4 PM
Oksana Kis
(Institute of Ethnology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lviv), "Remaining Human: Gendered Experiences of Ukrainian Women in the Gulag"

In the 1940-50s tens of thousands of Ukrainian women were sentenced to long-term imprisonment in the Gulag for political reasons. Their experiences of living in brutal conditions of the Soviet camps have not yet been a subject of special historical-anthropological research. This study is based primarily on the analysis of personal narratives of the Ukrainian female former prisoners of the Gulag (written memoirs, autobiographies, oral histories) as well as other sources (archival documents, demographical data, statistics, newspapers, male prisoners’ memoirs etc.).

Currently a Stuart Ramsay Tompkins Visiting Professor at University of Alberta, Dr. Oksana Kis is a Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of Ethnology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (NASU) in Lviv, Ukraine. She also serves as a President for the Ukrainian Association for Research in Women’s History. Her research interests cover Ukrainian women’s history, women in the traditional Ukrainian culture in the 19th and early 20th century, gender ideology and politics in the USSR and in post-socialist societies, oral history and memory studies. Dr. Kis’ current research project aims to explore the gender peculiarities of the Ukrainian women experiences of living through the most critical periods and events in the Soviet Ukraine history, it is based primarily on analysis of women’s personal narratives.

Register here
Room 208, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and Canadian Institute for Ukrainian Studies.

External event: Friday, January 31, 7:30 PM
Oksana Kis
(Institute of Ethnology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lviv), "HISTORY OF UKRAINE AS EXPERIENCED BY WOMEN: Personal Recollections of Women as Source Documents of Recent History" and a presentation and sale of the book NEZVYCHAINI DOLI ZVYCHAINYKH ZHINOK – Usna Istoriia ХХ Stolittia (editor Іroida Wynnycka. Lviv: Lviv Polytechnic Pub., 2013). In Ukrainian.

GALLERY KUMF, 2118 A Bloor Street W, Toronto
Sponsored by Shevchenko Scientific Society of Canada.

Wednesday, March 5, 6:00-9:00 PM
Singing workshop with Ukrainian Vocal Trio "Zozulka" (NYC)
(Eva Salina-Primack, Maria Sonevytsky and Willa Roberts)

About the Trio:

In Ukrainian villages, the zozulka - the little cuckoo bird - bears sad news, brings bad luck, foreshadows heartbreak. Zozulka, featuring Eva Salina Primack, Willa Roberts, and Maria Sonevytsky, brings the haunting multi-part women's vocal repertoire of the Ukrainian village to life in expressive, dynamic interpretations of songs that are little-known beyond Ukraine. Rich with harmony, strident unisons, and powerful lyrics, these songs transport you to the dense forests and wide-open steppes of another place and time.

Website: http://zozulkatrio.wordpress.com/

Download poster here

To register and for more information, email maria.sonevytsky@utoronto.ca

For more information contcat Maria Sonevytsky at maria.sonevytsky@utoronto.ca
Walter Hall University of Toronto, Faculty of Music
80 Queens Park, Toronto, ON M5S 2C5
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, the Department of Music, UofT, and the Petro Jacyk Education Foundation.

Thursday, March 6, 5:00-7:00 PM
Olga Pressitch
(University of Victoria) "Civil War as Musical Comedy: The Representation of the Ukrainian Revolution in the Soviet Film Wedding in Malinovka (1967)"

This paper explains the continued popularity in Russia of the 1967 Soviet film Wedding in Malinovka by analyzing its reliance on the traditional Russian cultural stereotype of Ukraine embedded in the burlesque style of kotliarevshchyna. The threat that the Ukrainian Revolution historically represented to Soviet Russian identity is normalized in the film, as well as in the 1936 eponymous operetta on which it is based, by framing it as an ethnic musical sitcom with dances. Although the two main yokels of the musical hail from a long line of Ukrainian and Jewish characters of popular theatre, both are also deeply ambivalent: one is a trickster who suddenly embraces the Bolshevik cause, while the other is the funniest and least threatening villain in Soviet film.

Olga Pressitch is completing a doctoral thesis on Ukrainian Canadian prose at the Shevchenko Institute of Literature in Kyiv, Ukraine. Since 2011 she has been Assistant Teaching Professor in Slavic Studies at the University of Victoria (Victoria, British Columbia, Canada). A published poet in Ukrainian and a member of Ukraine’s Writers’ Union, she has published articles in English and Ukrainian on diaspora literatures, Eastern European cinema, and Ukrainian art history.

This event is part of the Ukrainian Film Series at the Petro Jacyk Program for the study of Ukraine.

Chair: Thomas Lahusen, Univeristy of Toronto

Register here
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Friday, March 7, 7:00-9:00 PM
Zozulka Sings Village Songs from Polissia and Poltava, Ukraine
(Eva Salina-Primack, Maria Sonevytsky and Willa Roberts) and introductory notes by Maria Sonevytsky, the Petro Jacyk Postdoctoral Fellow and Assistant Professor of Music at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, NY.

In Ukrainian villages, the zozulka - the little cuckoo bird - bears sad news, brings bad luck, foreshadows heartbreak. Zozulka, featuring Eva Salina Primack, Willa Roberts, and Maria Sonevytsky, brings the haunting multi-part women's vocal repertoire of the Ukrainian village to life in expressive, dynamic interpretations of songs that are little-known beyond Ukraine. Rich with harmony, strident unisons, and powerful lyrics, these songs transport you to the dense forests and wide-open steppes of another place and time.

Website: http://zozulkatrio.wordpress.com/

Download poster here

Register here
Piano Room, 7 Hart House Circle, Toronto, ON M5S 3H3
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, the Department of Music, UofT, and the Petro Jacyk Education Foundation.

Tuesday, March 11, 3-5 PM
Margarita M. Balmaceda
(Seton Hall University and the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute), "The Politics of Energy Dependency: Ukraine, Belarus and Lithuania Between Domestic Oligarchs and Russian Pressure: a Book Presentation and Discussion of Current Energy Politics"

Recent events in Ukraine again bring up the question of Ukraine’s energy policy choices and the role of powerful domestic groups in relations with Russia and the EU. The Politics of Energy Dependency looks at theses issue from the perspective of post-independence energy politics in three post-Soviet states:
Ukraine, Belarus and Lithuania. It compares these three states’ reactions to the serious external shock of their sudden transformation, virtually overnight in 1991, from constituents of a single energy-rich state to being separate energy-poor entities heavily dependent on Russia, as well as politically independent transit states. Using extensive field research and until now untapped local sources in Ukrainian, Belarusian, Russian and Lithuanian, the project analyzes how these states’ unique location, not only between a major energy producer (Russia) and its main market (the EU), but also between powerful domestic economic actors often making a profit of their situation of energy dependency (“oligarchs”), and Russian power, has affected  Russia’s ability to use energy as a foreign policy tool in the region – and these states’ own political development.

Margarita M. Balmaceda is Professor of Diplomacy and International Relations at Seton Hall University and Research Associate at the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute. She is the author of, among others, Energy Dependency, Politics and Corruption in the Former Soviet Union (Routledge, 2008), The Politics of Energy
Dependency: Ukraine, Belarus and Lithuania Between Domestic Oligarchs and Russian Pressure (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2013), and Living the High Life in Minsk: Russian Energy Rents, Domestic Populism and Belarus’ Impending Crisis (Budapest: Central European University Press, January 2014).

Commentators: Lucan Way, University of Toronto, and Ulrich Best, York University (DAAD visiting professor)

Register here
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Friday, March 14, 5-7 PM
Andrew Wilson
(University College London), "'Ukraine: Whose Revolution?"

Dr. Wilson is a historian and political scientist specializing in Eastern Europe, particularly Ukraine. He is a Senior Policy Fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations, and Reader in Ukrainian studies at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies at University College London. He wrote The Ukrainians and Virtual Politics: Faking Democracy in the Post-Soviet World (2005), Ukraine's Orange Revolution (2005), and Belarus: the Last European Dictatorship (2011).

Register here
Campbell Conference Facility, South Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, University of Toronto, Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, University of Toronto, Centre for Jewish Studies, University of Toronto, Hart House Good Ideas Fund, University of Toronto, The Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Katedra Foundation, and School of Graduate Studies, University of Toronto.

Wednesday, March 19, 1-3 PM
The Crisis in Ukraine: Causes and Consequences: a Discussion Panel
Speakers: Robert Johnson, Paul Robert Magocsi, Peter Solomon, Lynne Viola, Lucan Way, Helena Yakovlev-Golani.
Chair: Randall Hansen

First Deputy Prime Minister of Crimea, Rustam Temirgaliev, stated that he is confident that the region will be a part of the Russian Federation “in a few days.” Ukraine’s Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk told journalists that the “so-called” referendum was illegal... Russian troops have occupied positions in Ukraine, and the West is threatening sanctions and Russia’s expulsion from the G8. A panel of specialists on Russia and Ukraine at University of Toronto will discuss how the greatest crisis in Europe since the collapse of the USSR is unfolding.

Register here
Campbell Conference Facility, South Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Wednesday, March 26, 12-2 PM
Anton Symkovych
(Petro Jacyk Visiting Scholar and a Senior Lecturer at the Department of Sociology, National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy), "Ukrainian Response to Sykes: The Organization of a Prisoner Society in a Ukrainian Correctional Colony."

Dr. Anton Symkovych will discuss prisoners’ organization in a Ukrainian medium-security correctional colony for men; prisoners’
culture and power relations between themselves and with prison staff.
He argues that despite official disapproval of the ‘inmate code’, prison authorities are heavily dependent on the prisoner-controlled informal structure to keep prison order and maintain uninterrupted industrial production. This rigid hierarchy is a permanent fixture which predetermined an individual’s role, expectation, and behaviour.
Without it the power balance and, thus, order could not be maintained.

Drawing on the data from his ethnographic study, the speaker posits that the ‘inmate code’ ensured a peaceable co-habitation for prisoners as it granted individuals some confidence and assurance of their position, if not a degree of autonomy. The majority of prisoners believed that this traditional arrangement was the only just and safe way to survive incarceration and thus it was normative behaviour to comply. Whilst this informal structure was inescapable and entailed harsh punishments for violations, it, to some degree, controlled and limited arbitrary violence. Finally, the talk will explore how the changing profile of traditional informal prisoner leaders, the availability of drugs, and policy changes such as the availability of early release, have threaten the legitimacy and sustainability of the informal prisoner control structure.

Register here
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Thursday, March 27, 4-6 PM
Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern
(The Crown Family Professor of Jewish Studies Professor of Jewish History, Department of History, Northwestern University), "Taverns, Vodka, and the Right to Drink: Jews and Slavs in the Ukrainian Market Towns"

In the Slavic imagination, the Jew was a quintessential inn-keeper: cunning, but ready with low prices on high-quality vodka. The Jewish tavern was a multi-purpose shtetl institution, where Poles, Russians, Ukrainians, and Jews did deals, arranged marriages, heard and discussed news, listened to music, played billiards and cards—and smoked, drank, ate, and danced. Since liquor-trade revenues yielded a handsome income, both the Russian administration and Polish nobility did their best to control and tax liquor. Explore how the Jews in the shtetls outwitted the liquor monopolists and why for the shtetl dwellers of different creeds the right to drink turned into a quest for freedom.

Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern will also be presenting his new book "The Golden Age Shtetl: A New History of Jewish Life in East Europe" (available early March, 2014). You will find more information on the book here.

Register here
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, the Centre of Jewish Studies, the Chair of Ukrainian Studies, the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, and Centre for Euroepan, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Friday, March 28, 2-4 PM
Mariya Lesiv
(Department of Folklore Memorial University of Newfoundland), "The Return Of Ancestral Gods: Modern Ukrainian Paganism Beyond Nationalist Politics."

Modern Ukrainian Pagans strive to revive beliefs and practices from the past millennia. They offer an alternative vision for a nation based on the rediscovery of ethnic roots in the contexts of socio-political turmoil. Modern Paganism spread among the urban Ukrainian intelligentsia in the North American diaspora after World War II, and developed actively in Ukraine following the collapse of the Soviet Union. Today, although experiencing a great decline in the diaspora, it is rapidly growing in Ukraine, involving many different Pagan communities and thousands of believers. Pagans resist both the external political oppression of Ukraine and the prominent position of Christianity in that country. Since Christianity dominates the spiritual discourse in Ukraine, Pagans are marginalized, and their ideas are perceived as radical and hostile by the larger society.

Drawing upon her book The Return of Ancestral Gods: Modern Ukrainian Paganism as an Alternative Vision for a Nation recently published by McGill-Queen’s University Press, Mariya Lesiv will discuss modern Ukrainian Paganism in relationship to nationalist politics and aesthetics. The majority of researchers of Slavic Paganisms concentrate predominantly on official Pagan discourse, namely, the voices of leaders as presented through official media such as publications, websites, and public presentations. These media indeed often reveal nationalist, racist and anti-Semitic sentiments expressed by some Ukrainian Pagans. However, Lesiv finds it important to consider not only how Paganism is preached but also the way that it is embraced on a private level. She will show that Paganism attracts a growing number of Ukrainians largely because of its aesthetic aspects rather than its associated politics, and will discuss the role that aesthetics may play in the further development of Ukrainian Paganism.

Register here
Room 208, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Thursday, April 3, 2-4 PM
Taras Kuzio
(CPRS, CIUS, University of Alberta), "The Crimea, Putin's Ukraine Policy and Domestic Ukrainian Politics: How did We Get Here and What this Holds for the Future."

Taras Kuzio is a Toronto-based expert on contemporary Ukrainian and post-communist politics, nationalism and European integration at the Centre for Political and Regional Studies, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta and Non-Resident Fellow, Center for Transatlantic Relations (CTR), School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), Johns Hopkins University. Taras Kuzio has been a political consultant to governments and legal and business consultant to the private sector on legal and economic questions.
Visit Dr. Kuzio's webpage for more information

Chair and commentator: Lucan Way (CERES, UofT)

How 'Nationalist' was Ukrainian Nationalism?
Room 208, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Tuesday, April 15, 4-6 PM
Serhiy Bilenky
(University of Toronto), "How 'Nationalist' was Ukrainian Nationalism? The Nineteenth-Century Ukrainian Movement"

A book launch to mark the appearance of Serhiy Bilenky, editor, Fashioning Modern Ukraine: Selected Writings of Mykola Kostomarov, Volodymyr Antonovych, and Mykhailo Drahomanov recently published by CIUS Press.

Dr. Bilenky will speak on “How ‘Nationalist’ was Ukrainian Nationalism? The Nineteenth-Century Ukrainian National Movement”

Professor Paul R. Magocsi, Professor Piotr Wrobel, and Professor Taras Koznarsky of the University of Toronto will discuss the significance of the new collection for the study and teaching of nineteenth-century Eastern European intellectual history.

New Book Features Founders of Modern Ukrainian National Idea


Fashioning Modern Ukraine: Selected Writings of Mykola Kostomarov, Volodymyr Antonovych, and Mykhailo Drahomanov. Edited by Serhiy Bilenky.


A new book, published by the CIUS Press as part of the Monograph Series of the Peter Jacyk Centre for Ukrainian Historical Research, is a collection of selected works by leading Ukrainian scholars whose academic writings became the founding pillars of Ukrainian national ideology in the 19th century and were the driving force behind Ukrainian national movement in the early 20th century.
            Mykola Kostomarov was the founder of the populist trend in Ukrainian historiography and national movement. Cofounder of the Cyril and Methodius Brotherhood in the 1840s and the author of its programmatic text The Book of Genesis of the Ukrainian People, Kostomarov took a moderate stance in national politics and regarded proliferation of culture and education as the best way of promoting the Ukrainian national idea. Apart from its vivid description of life in the mid-19th century, Kostomarov’s “Memoirs” represents one of his best known works on Russo-Ukrainian cultural and political relations from the 1840s to the 1860s. His essay on the “two Rus' nationalities” is an in-depth analysis of the cultural and societal differences between Ukrainians and Russians.
Volodymyr Antonovych was born into a Polish family in the Right-bank Ukraine. His life and works exemplify the creation of a modern Ukrainian national identity. His transformation from a Pole into a Ukrainian began with his discovery of the Ukrainian culture and folklore. This journey of discovery and identity-formation is described in his “Memoirs” and in “My Confession.” Antonovych switched his loyalties and his identity from Polish to Ukrainian and became the leader of the Old Hromada in Kyiv. He founded the so-called Kyiv school of historians and had a direct influence on the ideas and works of the renowned Ukrainian historian Mykhailo Hrushevsky.
            Mykola Drahomanov was born in Poltava to a family of Ukrainian Cossack nobles. He was an uncle of a famous Ukrainian poetess Lesia Ukrainka (Larysa Kosach). Drahomanov’s writings are regarded as positivist and liberal, and he considers individual freedom to be the highest goal to be achieved regardless of one’s nationality. He studied relations between an individual and a state and lobbied for a federal state system that would acknowledge freedoms and autonomy of cultural minorities. Drahomanov was the author of the first Ukrainian modern political program (presented in his introduction to the journal Hromada), which had a profound effect on the political parties in Western Ukraine and on the later policies of the Ukrainian Central Rada in 1917.

The book’s editor Serhiy Bilenky provides an informative introduction, in which he explains the historical context of the writings presented in the book, and provides numerous explanatory footnotes.

Register here
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, the Chair of Ukrainian Studies, the Chair of Polish History, the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies (Toronto office), and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Thursday, April 17, 2-4 PM
Amelia Glaser
(The University of California, San Diego), "Sholem Aleichem, Russian Literary Critic."

When Sholem Rabinovich (Sholem Aleichem) began writing Yiddish fiction, he was steeped in Russian literature. With only a few Yiddish humorists on which to model his prose, he based important aspects of his persona and poetics on exemplars from the Russian canon, in particular Gogol. Sholem Aleichem, beyond encouraging a comparison between himself and Gogol, also consciously modeled elements of his writing on Turgenev, Saltykov-Schedryn and his younger contemporary Maxim Gorky. In order to understand the intimate relationship between the writer canonized as the father of Yiddish prose (particularly in Russia) and the Russian literature he read, we must examine not only what Sholem Aleichem was borrowing from his Russian models, but what he was critiquing. By considering Sholem Aleichem as a critical reader of Russian literature, we begin to glean the importance of nineteenth century Russian literature to what was, at the turn of the twentieth century, a still-nascent Yiddish canon. This talk is drawn from the recent book, Jews and Ukrainians in Russia's Literary Borderlands: From the Shtetl Fair to the Petersburg Bookshop (Northwestern U.P., 2012).

Amelia Glaser is Associate Professor of Russian and Comparative Literature, and Chair of the Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies program at the University of California, San Diego. She is the author of Jews and Ukrainians in Russia's Literary Borderlands: From the Shtetl Fair to the Petersburg Bookshop (Northwestern U.P., 2012), and the translator and editor of Proletpen: America's Rebel Yiddish Poets (U. Wisconsin Press, 2005). This talk is sponsored in part by the Mellon foundation.

Register here
Alumni Hall, Rm 400, 121 St. Joseph Street, Toronto
Sponsored by the Mellon Foundation, Centre for Jewish Studies, Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures, Al and Malka Green Program in Yiddish Studies, the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

 

 


   
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