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All events are free and open to the public, but registration is required.


EVENTS IN 2011-2012

Wednesday, October 12, 4-6 pm
Marc Junge
(Petro Jacyk Visiting Scholar, Ruhr-University of Bochum, Germany), "Mass repression in Soviet Ukraine and its Dogmatic Interpretation in the Historiography"

Marc Junge specializes in Eastern European history, with primary interest is the history of Soviet Union, especially the development, expansion, and the “push back” of Stalinism. During his tenure at CERES, Marc will be working on a joint project together with Prof. Lynne Viola (Department of History, UofT) entitled “Perpetrators in the Soviet Ukraine 1928-1941.”

Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

Friday, October 28, 12-2 pm
Zbigniew Wojnowski
(the Petro Jacyk Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Ukrainian Politics, Culture, and Society), “Patriotism and the Empire: Ukraine views the socialist states of Eastern Europe”

Zbigniew Wojnowski specializes in modern European socio-cultural history, with a focus on the USSR, Ukraine and Russia. He is particularly interested in the evolution of Soviet nationalities policy and the growth of Soviet patriotism in Ukraine during the post-war period. More broadly, his research deals with twentieth-century East European popular culture, memory and commemoration, and the history of East-Central European borderlands. 

Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

Wednesday, November 16, 5-7 pm
Norman Naimark
(Robert and Florence McDonnell Professor in East European Studies, Stanford University), Annual Ukrainian Famine Lecture: "The Ukrainian Holodomor: Stalin and Genocide"

Norman Naimark holds the Robert and Florence McDonnell Chair in East European History at Stanford University. He is the author of two books on the Russian and Polish revolutionary movements of the late nineteenth century. He has also edited or co-edited books and document collections on the nationality problems of the Soviet Union, on the outbreak of World War II on the eastern front, on politics and history in the Soviet Union, on relations between Moscow and the Soviet Military Administration in Germany, on the establishment of communist power in Eastern Europe, on the Soviet occupation of Austria, and on the war in former Yugoslavia. Since publishing a major study of the Soviet occupation of Germany, The Russians in Germany (Harvard 1995) and a comparative study of ethnic cleansing and genocide in 20th Century Europe, Fires of Hatred (Harvard 2001), he has been working on two projects: a Mellon Foundation sponsored seminar series on “Mass Killing in the 20th Century” and his most recent book, Stalin’s Genocides (Princeton, 2010).

Download write-up here Download audio record here
Room 100 of the Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St George Street, University of Toronto
Co-sponsored by the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, The Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, Toronto Branch, and the Ukrainian Canadian Congress, Toronto Branch.

Thursday, November 17, 10:00-12:00 am
Norman Naimark (Robert and Florence McDonnell Professor in East European Studies, Stanford University), "Stalin's Genocides"
Graduate Student Workshop
Room 108, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Wednesday, November 23, 6:30-9:30 pm
Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Ukrainian Cinema since Independence

New Films and New Names from Ukraine. A parade of Canadian premiers

A selection of short films in various genres gives the viewer the idea of what’s cooking on the cutting edge of Ukrainian filmmaking today. Despite the absence of government and private support Ukrainian national film is alive and throbbing with new talent. The program includes Cross, dir. Maryna Vroda, the sensational winner of the Cannes 2011 Palme d’or du court métrage, world’s most prestigious award, March of the Fleas, dir. Taras Tkachenko, the Best Ukrainian Film Award at the Odesa International Film Festival-2011, Last Letter, dir. Yurii Kovaliov, Beyond Frames, dir. Maksym Ksionda, I Have a Friend, dir. Dmytro Moiseiev, Continuity, dir. Polina Kelm, the new and deliciously funny animations by Stepan Koval To Become Firm, Carol of the Bells, and by Oleksander Shmyhun Oh, Paris! All the shorts will be screened in Canada for the first time ever.

The screening will be followed by Q&A and discussion, mediated by Yuri Shevchuk, the Ukrainian Film Club's director.
The event is free and open to the public. The films will be shown in its Ukrainian or Russian language version with English subtitles.
Innis Town Hall, 2 Sussex Ave, Toronto, ON M5S1J5
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program, the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, and the Ukrainian Film Club, Columbia University.

Friday, November 25, 6-8 pm
Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Ukrainian Cinema since Independence

Kyiv Frescoes, 1966 and The Stone Cross, 1968 (Recovered Gems of Ukrainian Classical Film)

Kyiv Frescoes. 13 min. In this rarely seen 13-minute short Serhii Paradzhanov experiments with a dramatically new style that scandalized the Soviet censors with its expressive audacity and departure from socialist realism prescriptions.

The Stone Cross. 77 min. A Galician peasant Ivan Didukh in a desperate attempt to get his family out of abject poverty decides to leave his ancestral home and seek a better life in Canada. Inspired by stories of the Ukrainian writer Vasyl Stefanyk (1871-1936), this film is Ukrainian poetic cinema at its best, terse and laconic in outward expression, but intensely psychological in the understated delivery of its message. Shot in a striking black-and-white, it brings to mind Akira Kurosawa. Today "Stone Cross" remains little known and even less appreciated both in and outside Ukraine. A true gem of world film art it is a peak of Ukrainian filmmaking that has no parallels.
This is a Canadian premier of the two recently restored and digitally remastered cinematographic masterpieces.
Nonverbal and in Ukrainian with English subtitles.

The screening will be followed by Q&A and discussion, mediated by Yuri Shevchuk, the Ukrainian Film Club's director.
The event is free and open to the public. The films will be shown in its Ukrainian or Russian language version with English subtitles.
Room 108, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program, the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, and the Ukrainian Film Club, Columbia University.

Tuesday, January 17, 2-4 pm
Alla Galych (Former National Project Officer with the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe and Project Coordinator in Ukraine (OSCE PCU) in the Rule of Law and Human Rights Unit), "Trafficking in Human Beings in Ukraine: Latest Statistics, New Trends, Building the National Referral Mechanism"

The presentation will focus on the analysis of the recent trends in, and basic determinants of, human trafficking in Ukraine, as well as the state, international and NGO responses to the problem. Particular attention will be paid to the development of the National Referral Mechanism for trafficked victims and public awareness campaigns around the issues of human trafficking. Human trafficking from Ukraine to Canada also will be discussed.

Register here
Room 208, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

Wednesday, January 25, 2:00-4:00 pm
Khrystyna Pavlyk (Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Ukraine and Fulbright Scholar 2011/2012, State University of New York, Binghamton), "Nonprofits in Post-Soviet and Developed Economies: The Case of Ukraine."

Effective non-profit organizations are crucial for the civil society. While developed countries have decades of experience, nonprofits in post-soviet states have started to emerge only after proclamation of independence and market orientation in these counties. Was 20 year period enough to catch the knowledge lag on how to create and run an effective non-profit? Is there still a difference in the way non-profits function in these economies? Dr. Pavlyk did a comparative survey-based study in Ukraine. Like other parts of Soviet Union, Ukraine for decades had only governmental organizations which have never been interested in efficiency. Currently, over three hundred thousand   non-profits are officially registered in Ukraine. However, experts estimated that only 2,500 are actively operating. Khrystyna Pavlyk argues that operational environment is still among of the main differences creating the wide gap between non-profits in the developed and post-soviet countries. Most respondents mentioned that they are working in the legal environment which is less favorable than the one existing in developed countries. Assuming that Ukraine is a good representation of other post-soviet economies, her study shows that currently non-profits in these countries are still lagging behind the global trend, by having organization-centered marketing philosophy. This means that services are provided based on funding requirements which organization is capable to meet, and not the needs of society non-profits serve.
Register here
Room 108, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Friday and Saturday, January 27-28
“Ukraine in Global Context”: The Fifth Bi-annual Graduate Student Symposium

The Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (CERES) at the University of Toronto is pleased to announce the fifth bi-annual Ukrainian Studies Graduate Student Symposium. The Symposium will be held on January 27-28, 2012 at CERES, the Munk School of Global Affairs, 1 Devonshire Place. This year’s topic is “Ukraine in a Global Context,” which will bring a comparative perspective into focus. Continuing the tradition of this symposium, we invite young scholars from various disciplines to present their research and engage in discussion.

Key note address:"No Longer 'Between East and West': Ukrainian Cultural History Meets Regional Studies"by Serhy Yekelchyk (University of Victoria), Friday, January 27, 6:30-7:30 PM

This paper examines the newest trends in Ukrainian history writing. With the emergence of independent Ukraine old-fashioned debates about this country’s place between the “East” and “West” gave way to a more sophisticated understanding of the region as a cultural frontier. What is even more promising, in recent historical works there is a switch from the “national-history” perspective to that of the regional or local history, often benefitting from the use of microhistorical or cultural-anthropological approaches.
For the program, visit the symposium website.
Room 208, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, and School of Graduate Studies, the Faculty of Arts and Science, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Friday, February 17, 12:00 noon-2:00 pm
Christoph Witzenrath (the University of Aberdeen, Scotland and Petro Jacyk Visiting Scholar), "Slavery, Redemption and Politics in Seventeenth-Century Ukraine."

Facing one of the most important instances of slavery outside the Americas, early modern Ukrainian political actors used the language of redemption from slavery to gain moral capital in balancing the competing Eastern European empires and the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Liberation was a central concern due to the high numbers of people captured by nomads and sold on the slave market, second only to sub-Saharan Africa. With Exodus and Moses as template, Ukrainians went from adaptation to Commonwealth institutional environments to exit and, finally, establishing the Hetmanate. Owing to some degree to their first-hand experiences of Ottoman slavery, which was far from the simplified image of plantation chattel slavery, many Ukrainians had a relation to liberty that depended on the context; in its Polish variant they at times cherished it, while others unfavorably compared it to the religious tolerance and even to slavery in the Ottoman empire.
Register here
Room 208, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Thursday, March 1, 6:00-8:00 pm
Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Ukrainian Cinema since Independence: Day One

Ukraine. When the Countdown Began, 2011 (Documentary by Serhy Bukovsky)

Made on the occasion of the twentieth anniversary of Ukraine’s independence by the celebrated filmmaker Serhy Bukovsky, this feature documentary revisits the reasons of the Soviet collapse in 1991. Politicians, like the Ukrainians Leonid Kravchuk, Levko Lukianenko, Belarusian Stanislau Shushkevich, Russian Gennadii Burbulis, Americans Zbigniew Brzezinski and Brent Scowcroft, as well as Ukrainian public intellectuals, like Myroslav Popovych, Yaroslav Hrytsak, Oksana Zabuzhko, Hluzman, et al., each offere their analyses of the events leading up to Ukraine’s independence. Canadian premier
The film will be introduced by Yuri Shevchuk, lecturer of Ukrainian language and culture and director of the Ukrainian Film Club at Columbia University, New York. Discussion will follow the film screening. Event poster here.
Register here
Room 108, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program, the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, and the Ukrainian Film Club, Columbia University.

Friday, March 2, 6:00-8:00 pm
Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Ukrainian Cinema since Independence: Day Two

The Dream, 1964 (Feature film by Volodymyr Denysenko)

A biopic of the Ukrainian national poet Taras Shevchenko, made on the occasion of his 150th anniversary. It features the first part of Shevchenko's life leading up to the writing of his rebellious poem "The Dream". Restored and digitally re-mastered in 2011 the film features the first appearance on the silver screen of the iconic Ukrainian actor Ivan Mykolaichuk (as Taras Shevchenko).

The film will be introduced by Yuri Shevchuk, lecturer of Ukrainian language and culture and director of the Ukrainian Film Club at Columbia University, New York. Discussion will follow the film screening. Event poster here.
Register here
Room 108, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program, the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, and the Ukrainian Film Club, Columbia University.

External event: Monday, March 12, 7:00-9:00 pm
Volodymyr Mezentsev, Ph. D. (Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta), “The 2011 Excavations in Baturyn, Ukraine: The Wooden Structures and the Decorative Art of the Mazepine Baroque” (in Ukrainian)
Information: (416) 766-1408
Ukrainian Cultural Centre (83 Christie St., Toronto)

Sponsored by the Ucrainica Research Institute and Desna Foundation

Friday, March 16, 4:00-6:00 pm
Mykola Riabchuk (Ukrainian author and journalist), "Breaking a Vicious Circle: Ukraine between Feckless Democracy and Dysfunctional Authoritarianism"

Mykola Riabchuk is a well-known journalist and political analyst. He is author of Die reale und die imaginierte Ukraine [The real and the imagined Ukraine] (Suhrkamp 2006). Read more about him here.
Register here
Room 108, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Wednesday, March 28, 2-4 pm
Sergei Zhuk
(Petro Jacyk Visiting Scholar, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana), "Between Moscow and the West: Constructing the Soviet Self in the American Studies in Soviet Russia and Ukraine during Late Socialism (1956-1991)"

Professor Zhuk will talk about his new research project on a cultural, intellectual and social history of the American studies (Amerikanistika) in Russia and Ukraine after Stalin. Using various Soviet - Russian and Ukrainian - studies of the U.S./Canadian history, culture and politics, archival documents, personal correspondence of such Soviet Americanists like Nikolai Bolkhovitinov and Arnold Shlepakov, and more than 100 interviews as its historical sources, Sergei Zhuk will analyze how Russian and Ukrainian scholars employed different ideas of the North American civilization as the elements for (de)construction of Soviet and post-Soviet modernity in both Russia and Ukraine during the period of late socialism. Combining the methods of symbolic anthropology, oral history and historical sociology, Zhuk will focus on how the notions of the “imaginary West/imaginary America” and Soviet practices of history writing interacted with the ideological orthodoxy and centralist infrastructure of the American studies in the USSR and contributed to the intellectual opposition of the Soviet peripheries (Ukraine) to the Soviet center (Moscow) during the perestroika.

Register here
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Thursday, March 29, 12:00 noon-2:00pm
Zenon E. Kohut (Director, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies), "'Ruthenian' or  'Ukrainian': Nation (Narod) in the Political Rhetoric of Hetman Petro Doroshenko (1665-1676)."

This paper explores the use of the terms “Ukrainian nation” and “Ruthenian nation” by Hetman Petro Doroshenko and his contemporaries. It demonstrates that the Ukrainian terminology was reserved for the territory under the authority of the hetman which traditionally included the palatinates of Kyiv, Bratslav, and Chernihiv. In fact, it argues that Hetman Doroshenko’s rule represented the apogee of a growing Ukrainian identity, the major component of which included a defined Ukrainian territory and concepts of a Ukrainian Fatherland and a Ukrainian nation. Yet this Ukrainian nation was still part and parcel of a larger Ruthenian nation. While the hetman and the Zaporozhian Cossack Host were the “possessors” of Ukraine, they also continued to play the role of protectors of the Ruthenian nation both in the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania. Hetman Doroshenko, moreover, actively attempted to unite Ruthenian-inhabited territories into a Ruthenian-Ukrainian state. Thus, the concept of a common Ruthenian nationhood encompassing Ukraine, the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and the Kingdom of Poland, acted as a barrier for the emergence of the idea of a completely separate Ukrainian nation. The Ukrainian nomenclature was further diminished by the elimination of the Right-Bank Hetmanate (its chief proponent) and the utilization of an alternative “Little Russia” nomenclature within the surviving Left-Bank Hetmanate.
Register here
Room 208, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, Toronto Branch, the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Monday, April 16, 6:00-8:00 pm
Elana Jakel (University of Illinois), "In Search of "Peaceful Soviet Citizens": Identity, Justice, and the Holocaust in Postwar Ukraine"

This talk explores the participation and visibility of Jews and the Jewish genocide in the Soviet regime's efforts to document war crimes and mete out justice in the immediate aftermath of the Nazi occupation.  Using records from local Soviet Extraordinary State Commissions and trials of collaborators in Ukraine as well as autobiographical sources, Elana Jakel complicates the traditional narrative emphasizing the silence surrounding the Holocaust in the Soviet Union, epitomized by the erasure of Jewish victimhood in public discussions of the "peaceful Soviet citizens" murdered by the Nazis.  By giving careful attention to the context in which these documents, never intended for public consumption in the USSR, were produced and the language used in them, this analysis highlights the more complex ways in which Soviet, national, and other identities pervaded local conceptions of the human tragedy wrought by the occupiers.
Register here
Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Centre for Jewish Studies, and the Faculty of Arts and Science.

Tuesday, April 17, 5:30-7:30 pm
William Risch (Georgia College), "A Soviet West: Nationhood, Regionalism, and Empire in the Annexed Western Borderlands"

This paper will consider the role the Soviet Union's western borderlands annexed during World War II played in the evolution of Soviet politics of empire.  Using the Baltic Republics and Western Ukraine as case studies, it will argue that Sovietization had a profound impact on these borderlands, integrating them into a larger Soviet polity.  However, guerrilla warfare and Soviet policy making indirectly led to these regions becoming perceived as more Western and nationalist than other parts of the Soviet Union.  The Baltic Republics and Western Ukraine differed in their engagement with the Western capitalist world.  Their perceptions of what it meant to belong to a nation reflected different experiences of World War II. Consequently, this Soviet West was far from uniform, though it contributed to perceptions that the Soviet Union was an empire rather than a family of nations by the end of the 1980s.

Register here
Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Centre for Jewish Studies, and the Faculty of Arts and Science.

Thursday, April 19, 2012, 4-6 pm
Politics of History. Collective Memory and Competing Media Representations: World War II and Displaced Ukrainians (Mini-Symposium)
Participants: Marta Dyczok (University of Western Ontario), Vladyslav Hrynevych (National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine), Andriy Kulykov (talk show host, Svoboda Slova z Andriem Kulykovym, ICTV channel, Ukraine)
Download poster here

History is often political. As Martin Conway noted, the struggle for memory is a mechanism by which political forces compete for the present and the future. (Conway, 2004) History remains an important battleground in today’s globalized world and certainly in the Post Communist space. This symposium presents new perspectives on the debates by bringing together an international, inter-disciplinary panel. The focus will be on World War II and Ukraine. However, rather than trying to determine who were the ‘heroes’ and who were the ‘villains,’ the speakers will explore the international context of the history and memory of millions of ordinary Ukrainians uprooted during the course of the war. They will discuss how experiences were politicized during the Cold War, how debates are changing after the collapse of communism, and the importance of mass media in this process.
Register here
Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

 

 

 


   
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